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Allergen Calendar

The following allergens are currently in season.

Dust mite icon

Dust Mites

January - December
There’s no escaping dust mites – they’re a year-round problem all over the U.S. and the state of Texas. You’ll find them lurking in every corner of your house, behind the curtains, in your carpet, on your pets, and in your bed. Dust mite allergens are a common trigger of asthma symptoms and a major irritant for Texas allergy sufferers. Dust mites thrive in warm, humid environments such as bedding, upholstered furniture, and carpeting.
Mold spore icon

Mold Spores

January - December
Molds are another year-round problem affecting Texas allergy sufferers. Mold spores float in the air, much like pollen, increasing as temperatures rise in the spring. Symptoms of a reaction to mold allergies include sneezing, itching, congestion, runny nose and dry, scaling skin. Mold spores may enter the nose and cause hay fever symptoms, or trigger asthma if they reach the lungs. Indoor molds and mildew need dampness, and thrive in basements, bathrooms or anywhere with a leaky water source.
Ragweed allergen icon

Ragweed

Mid-July - Mid-November
According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, about 75% of Americans who have plant allergies are sensitive to ragweed. You’ll find common ragweed sprouting in the fields and roadsides, riverbanks, and throughout rural areas of Texas. Ragweed pollen season begins in mid-summer and continues through the middle of November. Species of ragweed account for most of the hay fever reactions experienced in the fall months. Symptoms include sneezing and runny nose, as well as itchy eyes.
Grass allergen icon

Grass

March - Mid-October
Grass pollen season in Texas begins in early March and doesn’t end until grasses stop releasing pollen in mid-October. As grass releases pollen into the air, the wind can carry it for miles on dry, sunny days. Pollen counts are usually lower on damp or cool days. Grass pollen is microscopic. Though you may not see it in the air, if you’re allergic to grass pollen, you may experience a reaction even to small amounts of it.
Pecan allergy icon

Pecan

Mid-March - June
Pecans: the official state tree of Texas. You’ll find pecan trees in the woods and orchards all over Texas. Though pecans are delicious in pies and other deserts, the pollen produced by pecan trees is second only to ragweed as a source of severe allergies. Peak time for pecan pollen release occurs from mid-March to late May, when it is spread all over the state by springtime winds.
Elm tree allergen icon

Oak

Mid-February - Mid-May
Oak trees release their pollen in late winter and spring, blanketing our homes, vehicles, pets, and everything else in their path with a coating of yellow, dust-like particles and causing very serious reactions among allergy sufferers. People who are allergic to oak pollen may experience symptoms that include sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy nose and throat, dark circles under the eyes, coughing, postnasal drip, and swollen, watery and itchy eyes.
Mulberry allergen icon

Mulberry

Mid-February - Mid-April
Mulberry reaches it's peak allergy season from Mid-February to Mid-April. It's a short season but these trees are known to be heavy pollenizers, making it a miserable allergy season for some. The type of trees that are the heavy pollinizers are the non-fruit producing trees. In an effort to control the mulberry population, many cities are banning the planting of new mulberry trees to cut down on overall misery.
Ash tree allergen icon

Ash

February - Mid-April
Ash trees can grow up to 90 feet tall and resist insects and disease. Unfortunately, ash trees are another troublesome source of irritation for Texas allergy sufferers in the early spring. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to ash pollen may include sneezing, nasal congestion, watery eyes, runny nose, itchy throat and eyes, and wheezing.
Elm allergen icon

Elm

February - Mid-March
Elm trees start blooming in February and release pollen into late March throughout central Texas. If you find yourself fighting a mid-winter allergic reaction, elm is a likely culprit. Elm pollen affects allergy sufferers with asthma-like symptoms, itching, sneezing, wheezing, headache, sinus pain, breathing problems, red or tearing eyes, runny nose, itchy eyes and throat, cough, or dark circles under eyes.

Here's when allergies are affecting us throughout the year.

allergy calendar texas

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